UPA (Utanian Press Agency)
Release: April 8, 301 AP.

Nystonian Election no landslide, but still a victory

The Cruistian Democrat-Liberal Nationalist government of Governor Cryer has won the election, slipping one seat into majority without Democrat support, but the election win is a far cry from the landslide being predicted. In fact, the Peoples Party have polled far more strongly than anyone expected.

The state has voted and the results appear somewhat clearcut with few electorates contested in this semi-FPP electing state. The Cruistian Democrat-Liberal Nationalist coalition government has secured 37 of the state's 73 parliamentary seats, with significant wins in more rural, Utani seats as well. This gives Governor Cryer an allied government with a single seat holding their majority. This is three seats more than the previous government, and removes the government's reliance on the moderating Democratic Party, though both the Conservative and Democrat parties are likely to support the government on a great variety of issues. However, it now means that Governor Cryer need not include two Democrats in his cabinet, provided his own government is solidly unified and no single dissenting vote will be heard, one vote being enough to undo his coalition. Government discipline will be paramount, with Party Whips having their jobs magnify in importance. Yet, both the CDP and the LNP have been very careful with their candidates, having tough preselection processes, especially after several MPs voted against the government Death Penalty bill, and their hardline policies usually attract extremely devoted members. It is likely dissent will be in few cases, providing the Governor the opportunity to jettison the troublesome Democrats - though, not too far.

Both the Conservative and Democratic parties gained a seat each, at the expense largely of government MPs. The government recovered by gaining several seats from the Utani Saedaj Party (USP) in rural electorates, which lost five seats. The Peoples Party remains at 15 seats, while the leftist Republican Party gained one seat, and the Burovians enter the state parliament for the first time with two MPs.

Party breakdown percentages Parliamentary seats, Nystonia 301ap

The result is, despite the smaller scale than expected, a significant win for the government. The conservative parties won an additional six seats, keeping a Peoples Party lead coalition out of government by at least 26 seats. This maintains the stranglehold conservative politics will have in Nystonia, maintaining the Governor's policies of "tough on crime", major public constructions, and moral law. In other words, it will be business as usual.

The addition of the socially-progressive, economically-conservative Burovians in place of the Liberals is a significant change, a challenge to the Liberals who have become less economically conservative in recent years. The Burovians have indicated their middle-of-the-road stance, neither joining the government-allied Democrats, or the Opposition. They are in favour of the Governor's crime policies, including the death penalty, and fiscal responsibility, are less enamoured by the major program of development works, but are largely opposed to many of the "moral laws" he has introduced, such as the arrest of dozens of homosexuals for freely admitting their homosexuality.

Regardless, one cannot expect much to change now, Governor Cryer himself won a massive 63% of the gubernatorial vote, Montgomery Ashton winning only 31%. The Governor is popular, his government is solidly in power, and the state will remain under his "fatherly" guidance for the next four years.

<Tech>
This election was generated by random methods, with the latest poll as the seed for the final results. A random function was used to determine the percentage of the vote going each party's way, and then a second random function to determine the seats won in a somewhat proportional fashion. The result is a shock, but everything went the way of the Peoples Party!
</Tech>


©UPA, 301 AP.

<TECH>
©Mike Ham, 2001. All rights reserved. No reproduction without, at least, tacit approval. ;-)